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5 Things to Know Today: November 21, 2016

5 Things to Know Today: November 21, 2016

Liz Biscevic—5 Things To Know Today

In case you missed it, Turkey plans to raise 28-billion dollars for renewable energy, artificial intelligence might be the best weapon against illegal fishing, and researchers at the University at Buffalo discovered a fluorescent dye that acts like a battery.

Photo by Douglas Levere

Photo by Douglas Levere

1. Inc.: 2017 is the year of the electric car.

With longer driving ranges, fewer operational costs, futuristic features, and new designs, 2017 is predicted to be a big year for electric cars.

2. Industry Leaders Magazine: Turkey plans to raise 28-billion dollars for renewable energy by 2020.

According to the International Finance Corporation, Turkey is emerging as a hotbed for renewable energy investment opportunities. By 2020, roughly $16.4 billion is expected to go toward wind energy projects, $7.4 billion for solar projects, $3.4 for geothermal energy endeavors, and just over half a billion dollars for hydroelectric projects.   

3. The Guardian: Artificial intelligence may be able to stop illegal fishing. 

Facial recognition technology has been used to help cops catch bad guys for years, but it needs to be a whole lot smarter before it can be used to prevent crimes like illegal fishing. Right now, a $150,000 award is being offered to any data scientist who can write a facial recognition code precise enough to recognize illegal catch on fishing boats. 

4. New Atlas: There’s a new dye that acts like a high-powered battery.  

BODIPY, a fluorescent dye being researched at the University at Buffalo, might be the answer for storing and transferring energy in next-generation batteries strong enough to power cars and houses.

5. Business Insider: A software company just figured out how to prevent birds from crashing into its windows.

Last month, Intuit, the company behind QuickBooks and TurboTax, unveiled the newest addition to its corporate campus, featuring several sustainable innovations. For instance, the exterior windows were developed in consultation with the Audubon Society and are meant to prevent birds from flying into them. Other features include a regal-looking staircase to encourage workers to take the stairs rather than the escalator and a solar-panel filled roof that provides about a quarter of the building's energy needs. 

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