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5 Things to Know Today: December 20, 2016

5 Things to Know Today: December 20, 2016

Liz Biscevic—5 Things to Know Today

Photo via Inhabitat

Photo via Inhabitat

In case you missed it, the world’s first 3-D printed car might revolutionize the auto-making process, there’s a startup in Wisconsin that’s helping counter the waste from cardboard boxes, and the next big thing in renewable energy might be power from jellyfish. 

1. Sierra Club: The Divergent 3D’s “Blade” is the world’s first 3-D printed car.
Aside from it going from zero to 60 miles per hour in 2.5 seconds, the technology behind the Blade's prototype has the potential to revolutionize the auto industry by reducing the environmental impact during the car making process. 

2. Fast Coexist: Charities where your dollar goes the farthest. 
A U.K. organization that evaluates charities called Giving What We Can recommends only four organization in its analysis of where your money makes the biggest impact. Among the most impactful ways to give are in developing nations, addressing problems with low political barriers, and donating to underfunded causes. 

3. Inhabitat: The next big thing in renewable energy is…jellyfish power?
As a way to address the toxic materials often used in the solar industry, some scientists are experimenting with "biosolar" and have figured out how to create sustainable solar cells out of jellyfish goo. 
 
4. The Guardian: The secret to cutting our carbon footprint could be to build more freeways.
Blue Planet, a building materials company, has begun to create limestone out of carbon dioxide waste collected from power plants. Because cement production accounts for 5 percent of global CO2 emissions, Blue Planet's process could be a game-changer, especially if they can make headway with highway contractors, one of the biggest buyers of cement and rock.

5. Triple Pundit: There’s a startup in Wisconsin that’s tackling cardboard waste. 
With the rise of online shopping, cardboard waste is at an all-time high, and recycling is often not enough. Instead, the Wisconsin startup Box Latch Products imagined a way to make cardboard more reusable by eliminating the need for tape. The invention is a simple, plastic accessory that easily seals cardboard boxes without tape, and doesn’t damage the boxes when it’s removed. 

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