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5 Things to Know Today: December 8, 2016

5 Things to Know Today: December 8, 2016

Liz Biscevic—5 Things to Know Today

Photo via MEDO/CNN

Photo via MEDO/CNN

In case you missed it, Leonardo DiCaprio schooled Donald Trump about the relationship between preserving the environment and creating jobs, Apple just made a huge investment in wind power, and 14 high school girls built Africa’s first private satellite.  

1. Time: Leonardo DiCaprio educated Donald Trump about economic growth and green energy.

Leonardo and the CEO of his foundation, Terry Tamminen, gave a presentation to Trump and members of his team about how investing in sustainable infrastructure could create millions of jobs. 

2. Men’s Journal: 5 huge mistakes parents make when teaching their kids about money.

If you lie and say you don’t have money when your kid is begging for a candy at the checkout stand, you might be teaching a confusing lesson. These mistakes may not lead to destitution, but they will shape their saving and spending habits in the future.

3. Business Insider: Apple just made its first huge investment in wind power.

Apple just bought stake in projects led by the world’s largest wind power turbine maker, Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology. Though Apple is not building wind power turbines, they will use the power generated to sell clean energy to the Chinese factories manufacturing its products.

4. Wikipedia is an example of gender inequality, and BBC is trying to fix it.

Only 17 percent of English-language Wikipedia profiles are about women. Today BBC is hosting a 12-hour edit-a-thon to create biographies about notable women who, until now, have been left out of Wikipedia’s biographies. 

5. Science Alert: 14 teenage girls just build Africa’s first private satellite.

Fourteen South African teenagers built a private satellite as part of a high school STEM boot camp. The students designed the satellite to orbit over Earth’s poles and monitor Africa’s shifting weather conditions, sending detailed thermal imaging data back to Earth twice a day to help prevent disaster and improve food security in the country. The satellite was bought by South Africa's Meta Economic Development Organisation (MEDO) and is scheduled to launch in May of next year. 

BONUS: A timelapse by Google Earth shows how the earth has changed in 32 years as a result of Global Warming. 

In just 32 years, Bolivia's Lake Poopo dried up completely, Maryland salt marshes are almost fully submerged under water, and Greenland's ice sheet is melting, which can cause sea levels to rise by 20 feet. View the whole video here. 

GIF via Google Earth

GIF via Google Earth

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