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5 Things to Know Today: March 14, 2017

5 Things to Know Today: March 14, 2017

Liz Biscevic—5 Things to Know Today

Photo via Health Warrior

Photo via Health Warrior

In case you missed it, Health Warrior is giving back to the indigenous Mexican people that inspired their protein bars. Also, a University of Southern California professor became the first African American to head up one of the Fed’s reserve banks, and new urban "wind trees" can generate electricity from a city breeze.

1. Forbes: Healthy snack business Health Warrior is giving back to the indigenous people that inspired its products.
Health Warrior’s chia-based protein bars were inspired by the Tarahumara, a people indigenous to Northern Mexico best known for their ability to run extreme distances fueled by a predominately plant-based diet. Now years later, Health Warrior launched an online campaign to raise $40,000 to restore the tribe’s farms that were affected by drought. The campaign ends tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. Eastern and has already surpassed its initial fundraising goal, allowing Health Warrior to assist in farming labor and supplies, including chia seed stock to create an enduring partnership between the company and the people who inspired it.

2. The Atlantic: New figures suggest 'Trumpcare' would increase number of uninsured Americans by 86 percent
On Monday, the Congressional Budget Office estimated that under the newly proposed American Health Care Act, 24 million people would lose insurance and premiums for remaining customers would spike in the short-term. However, the report also projected that in the longterm, premiums were likely to drop by an average of 10 percent for people in the individual marketplace. The AHCA is the first attempt by Republican leadership to make good on promises to repeal Obamacare and replace it with something more in line with fiscal conservative values. 

3. CityLab: Only 10 percent of people would change their morning commute times, even if they were paid. 
Last year, the San Francisco Bay Area became a test for a mass-transit incentives program that rewarded BART commuters who took later trains to avoid morning rush hour. The six-month trial ended in February and results weren’t great. Around 18,000 people took BART up on the incentives—which gave commuters points they could exchange for cash every time they chose a train running later or earlier than the 7:30-8:30 a.m. window—but only around 250 people a day actually switched their commute. BART confirmed that it cleared up the equivalent of around two train cars’ worth of people daily, but didn’t make a noticeable difference in crowding. 

4. LA Times: A USC professor became the first African American to lead one of the Fed’s 12 regional banks. 
Raphael Bostic, the director of the Bedrosian Center on Governance at University of Southern California’s Sol Price School of Public Policy, was named the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. This announcement comes after advocacy groups and Congress criticized the Fed for a lack of diverse leadership.

5. Curbed: Urban “Wind Trees” can generate electricity from your city’s breeze.
French firm New Wind created a “Wind Tree” that generates nearly 3,500-13,500 Kilowatt hours of electricity each year. The tree uses “aeroleaves” that are basically silent micro wind turbines that can work at speeds as low as 4.5 miles per hour, which makes it suitable for cities, alongside buildings, or even in people’s backyards. Right now, a tree can cost anywhere from $20,000 to $50,000 dollars and can power approximately 15 street lamps, 83 percent of a typical household's electricity usage, or 10,163 miles in an electric car. 

5 Things to Know Today: March 15, 2017

5 Things to Know Today: March 15, 2017

This Woman Figured Out the Best Thing to Do with Old Amazon Boxes

This Woman Figured Out the Best Thing to Do with Old Amazon Boxes