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5 Things to Know This Weekend: April 21, 2017

5 Things to Know This Weekend: April 21, 2017

Liz Biscevic—5 Things to Know Today

Happy Friday! Here are 5 things to know that happened this week, unless you plan on channelling your inner Joey Tribiani during this weekend's brunch. 

MONDAY: Oklahoma isn't helping the whole climate change thing. 

Oklahoma revoked a state tax credit for electricity generated by zero-emission facilities. The tax credit has been around since 2003, and since then Oklahoma's wind energy sector has become the third largest in the country.. 

Meanwhile, in Saudi Arabia, 30 new solar and wind projects will join the nation’s fleet of programs aimed to boost power generation and cut oil consumption over the next 10 years. Though Saudi Arabia is the biggest exporter of oil, they’ve set a goal to produce 10 percent of its power from renewable sources by 2023. 

TUESDAY: A snack provider wants to pop your bubble. 

Photo via Getty Images

Photo via Getty Images

Kind Snacks’ nonprofit division launched a Facebook plugin called Pop Your Bubble, which connects users to profiles stating vastly different opinions in the hopes it spurs healthy discussion and widens peoples' viewpoints. With a visit to popyourbubble.com, users can connect their Facebook profile and get suggestions of 10 others to follow who espouse very different points of view.

WEDNESDAY: Bill O'Reilly is out.

Photo via Broadsheet

Photo via Broadsheet

On Wednesday, Fox News’ “The O’Reilly Factor” turned into the “The Factor,” after 20 years on air. That’s because apparently Bill O’Reilly has quite a few sexual harassment claims against him, and both he and 21st Century Fox have paid women nearly $13 million to keep it quiet, according to recent reporting by The New York Times. 

CLIMATE WATCH: Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about the denial of science in America in a four-minute video. 

The new company, called Neuralink, aims to take cloud-based artificial intelligence and create an extension of the human brain, which would allow people to communicate telepathically with other people who have the product and, of course, are willing to connect. 

FRIDAY: Canada will uphold net neutrality.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)—aka, the people who control the internet of Canada—ruled to uphold net neutrality. This means internet service providers are legally bound to treat data traffic equally to promote innovation and a free exchange of ideas. "A free and open Internet gives everyone a fair chance to innovate and for a vast array of content to be discovered by consumers,” says Jean-Pierre Blais, the CRTC chairman and CEO. The U.S. government, however, appears to be taking the opposite approach.

Need some more good news? Read on. 

Earlier this month, a group of women in Australia hosted their third annual “Glitter Extravaganza” in the middle of rural Queensland. The group originally got together over their love of lingerie, though their shindig—which involved covering their naked bodies with glitter—was a stand against the lingerie industry, which portrays women’s bodies in an unrealistic way. Their glitter-filled photoshoot is a way to inspire women to embrace the bodies they have, regardless of what they see in advertisements.  

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